Latest Posts

#Fearless But Still, I Rise MHAM Shirts On Sale Now!

It’s finally here, May 1st. That means it’s officially Mental Health Awareness Month, and the But Still, I Rise t-shirts are officially on sale!

I don’t know about you, but I’m really excited about this fundraiser, so if you missed the details in my Mental Health Awareness Month announcement article, here’s what you need to know:

  • The t-shirts are being sold through TeeSpring, and will be available for purchase May 1-May 31 at 11:59 p.m. MST.  You can order them by clicking here!
  • We are selling t-shirts, hoodies, stickers and mugs, all of which will have the beautiful design (created by Allie Dearie) on them.
  • 75% of your purchase will go directly to The Trevor Project, an organization that focuses on crisis intervention and suicide prevention in LGBTQ+ teens. The other 25% will go to helping maintain #Fearless (such as keeping our domain, purchasing a stock photo subscription, or something else that helps keep our site working wonderfully!).
  • Because we know that price is everything, we made sure to price our items in a way that would maximize profit without making you feel like you have to give up an arm and a leg. So, if you haven’t clicked the link yet and want to know the prices we’re selling the shirts for, here they are:
    • $20 for t-shirts
    • $35 for a hoodie
    • $10 for a mug
    • $5 for a sticker
  • This is the most important note of all. On the website, it will have a countdown timer to when the “campaign” ends. Despite what this timer says, the campaign will run for 31 days! That timer is just a countdown to when the shirts will be printed, not to the actual end of the t-shirt sale.

It is my hope that this t-shirt fundraiser will yield a bigger donation than last year’s – which was $220. It would be amazing if we could raise as much money as possible for this wonderful organization! So, tell your friends, your family and your neighbors, and buy a t-shirt, mug or sticker.

Any questions, comments or concerns about the t-shirt fundraiser, don’t hesitate to comment on this post or email contact@hashtagfearless.com.

Once again, if you want to buy a shirt, you can do so by clicking here!

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

#Fearless Family: It’s The Little Things In Love

By Cheryl Fazio
#Fearless Family Writer

I used to attach a great deal of significance to grand gestures.  I was in an abusive relationship and always waiting for my ex to make some unequivocal declaration of love that would dispel all my doubts; I was waiting for something that would somehow make the cheating, manipulation, and lies all magically okay.  Now I’ve been married almost a year and I have a new perspective on grand gestures.

My relationship with my spouse, Senia, progressed incredibly naturally.  We met blogging about George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series.  Specifically, we met blogging (and writing erotic fanfiction) about probably the most objectively villainous family in the ASOIAF universe, House Bolton.  Most infamous for their practice of flaying their enemies, and occasionally wearing cloaks made from the skin, “Bolton fandom” was understandably a very niche subgroup of the larger ASOIAF fandom.  

I found this subset at a fortuitous time. Apparently, I’d just missed a lot of drama involving clashes between Bolton fans and some people on the Internet who honestly, truly believed they had the moral right to tell people they’d never met what they could and could not enjoy in fiction. I was thankful I had missed the internet clash, because I had never engaged with anyone or been actively involved before, and my skin wasn’t yet tough enough for me to have survived and still remain active.

At some point as I gradually dipped my toes further and further into Bolton fandom, and soon after I started following Senia on Tumblr when they posted about another fan who was going to be visiting from abroad. They were planning a meet-up of House Bolton fans and made a post inviting other fans in the NYC area to come join. I desperately wanted to go, but I was too anxious to message them and let them know. This was my first foray into actually being active in the fandom and my lack of confidence had always been a major obstacle. I had always lacked the confidence to share any of my fanfiction online, or even just engage with other fans, and I was fully prepared to miss out on this experience as well.  I just didn’t think that I was ready, or worthy, or any other number of self-deprecating things that your brain tells you over and over when you have depression and anxiety.

That would have been the end of it, except at the same time I was resigning myself to missing out, Senia had received an anonymous message from someone who said they lived on Long Island and wanted to come to the meet-up, but was too shy to reveal who they were. Since Senia knew that I lived on Long Island, they messaged me to ask if I was the person who had contacted them. I, of course, hadn’t even been able to overcome my anxiety to even say something anonymously, but I answered the message and asked if it would be okay if I came along anyway, even though I wasn’t the person who had originally reached out.

We went to the Bronx Zoo.  In the days leading up to the get-together, I got my nails done and got my hair cut.  I wore what was, in my opinion, my coolest outfit. I brought Long Island bagels to try to get everyone to like me. It was all very high school, but I was a brand new baby queer on top of being a newcomer to Bolton fandom, and I wasn’t sure exactly how to deal with how attractive I found Senia. The dual ideas that exploring your sexuality and gender at twenty-five years old was a valid thing to do, was still mind-blowing enough.

After that day at the zoo, we made plans later in the week to hang out, just the two of us. It took almost six months for us to cuddle; by that point, we had a close-knit group of mutual friends and we “didn’t want to ruin the friendship” by dating and potentially breaking up. A mutual friend had to practically lock us in the room to get us to confess our feelings for each other. We didn’t even kiss that night. That took us at least another month.  

The kiss finally happened after we went on a hike together in the woods near Senia’s parents’ house. We were searching for Satan’s Lair, an abandoned military complex rumored to be rift with devil worshipers and supernatural occurrences. We took a trail that ended in a graveyard and the tension as we laid in the grass to rest were so unbearable we almost didn’t make it back to the privacy of Senia’s bedroom.  I remember the dust from the trail still clinging to my boots in the days and weeks after; I refused to wash them.

During the course of our ensuing relationship, I went through a lot of changes. I came out as a nonbinary demi-boy and started using they/them pronouns. I came out (as far as sexuality goes) to my conservative Italian Catholic parents. I graduated from law school and decided a career in law wasn’t right for me. Forgoing the bar exam, I decided I would, somehow, get back into writing again and begin developing myself as some kind of almost-artist, academic type person. I began developing a support system that was actually that—supportive. And always, through all these struggles, Senia was there to listen, to hold me when I cried, but also to help me find real solutions.

wedding 1

Cheryl and Senia sharing a kiss on their wedding day (photo submitted by Cheryl).

When we got engaged, there was no fancy proposal, no plan.  There wasn’t even a ring. We were riding on the subway, talking about how our current lease was due to expire in a few months, and were trying to decide whether we should re-sign or move out. We both confessed that each envisioned living with the other, to quote Senia at the time, “…forever.”  Marriage seemed like the natural next step.

I used to think the only way to know if someone “truly” cared about you was to have them prove it with some unexpected, sweeping surprise. I waited almost eight years for my abuser to show me I meant something to him via one pivotal moment that would forever change my life and my perception of what he thought of me. Instead, gestures like Senia bringing me coffee in bed because they’ve memorized my order, scooping the cats’ litter box every night because I work at a cat cafe and scoop litter all day, and the way we tailor who does what chores to meet each other’s specific needs, mean more now that any dramatic, one-time effort to “prove” how much the relationship means.  

The things that provide the same emotional response as those imagined “grand gestures” are no less grand for being small.  And though they are understated, our relationship does have what I’d consider to be “grand gestures” now—on our wedding day, in their vows, Senia asked that I do one thing that, while difficult, meant the world to me because no one had ever asked it of me before.  With them by my side, they asked that I follow my dreams.  With them, I am here today doing my best—even writing this is part of that next step.

Thank you to Cheryl for sharing their wonderful story!

If you would like to join the #Fearless Family, please visit the #Fearless Family page for more information on submission guidelines!

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

Dear Thomas Sanders: Thank You.

Dear Thomas Sanders,

I’m not sure if you’ll ever see this letter, but I sure hope one day you do. I’ve been trying to decide the best way to approach this, and it’s been a tough one. Do I talk about how much I love your videos (especially the Story Time and Disney Pranks)? Do I mention that your YouTube videos are some of the greatest content I’ve seen in a long time? It’d be easy to spend this letter fangirling about the amazing content you make, but I think for me this letter is much more than that.

To make it simple, this letter is to say thank you. Thank you for all that you do, and I hope you realize just how much of an impact you have on people. I have never once felt out of place when watching your videos, or interacting with the fans you have. You’re so inclusive, right down to your pretty amazing “Guys, gals and nonbinary pals!” catch phrase. Could you call that a catchphrase? Well, I’m calling it a catchphrase.

Since it was released, I have probably watched your Having Pride video about 3,000 times. Okay, that’s an exaggeration, but I watch it often. Each time I watch I find something else I resonate with, but the one that made me laugh the most was when you talked about how you have to come out multiple times, because there’s always going to be someone who didn’t know.

Well… I was one of those people that either didn’t pay enough attention, or never put 2 and 2 together, but I messaged my sister a couple months ago after seeing your “Everyone in this room is totally straight…just kidding, April Fools!” vine. The wheels slowly started turning and when the realization happened I gasped audibly. I said to her, “OHMYGAH DID YOU KNOW THOMAS SANDERS ISN’T STRAIGHT?!” And she said, “Uh, yeah, he’s totally made that obvious so many times. How did you not know that?”

I felt pretty silly that I missed all the clues (and there were PLENTY now that I go back and look!), but then when you made that comment about coming out multiple times I couldn’t help but laugh and go, “Yeah, I’m part of that problem!”

But I digress…

When you published the pride video, it was the first time I ever had the opportunity to listen to people speak openly about their sexuality and identities in that way, and it moved me. Recently discovering my pansexuality meant I had a lot of questions, many of which I felt strange about asking because I am married, and far beyond the time of exploring it the way many get the chance to. I was comfortable with the discovery of my pan-ness, and I have no regrets, but even in such a connected world it’s easy to feel like you’re the only one with a certain issue.

To hear my feelings validated by not just you, but all your amazing friends was such a moving experience. I don’t really have a strong LGBTQ friend group where I live and I almost felt like in that video, I was sitting on the sofa with your friends and really just exploring these topics with you. There were times when you put into words the feelings and notions I’d been having that I just couldn’t put a finger on, and for that I’m grateful.

You talked about repression of the feelings you had, and I feel like that point hit home pretty dang hard.  My feelings have always been constant, but due to many circumstances beyond my control, I felt the need to repress them and it took a lot of self discovery before I could adequately understand how I was feeling. I just went about my life, whether it was in denial or just being that naive, thinking that I was straight, and straight people felt how I felt (spoiler alert: they don’t!).

There was also something that Joan said (I think it was Joan) that personally accepting who they were was far more meaningful than actually coming out, and that absolutely resounded with me. When I discovered who I was sexually, I spent a good 3-4 months just trying to understand it. I spent a lot of time trying to come to terms with it, and trying to just understand what it meant for me and my life. Coming out, for me, was a much more internal and personal journey of accepting something I had so perfectly suppressed my entire life. When I did decide to come out publicly, it was less about my friends and family knowing, and more of a declaration of personal acceptance.

Not only did this video help me understand more about myself, it also educated me on how to handle situations with a variety of different people. I’ve always been such a strong ally to the LGBTQ community, but understanding how I can make interactions easier and more comfortable was still something I was figuring out. If anything, regardless of whether or not you identify as LGBTQ, that video is a must see for allies of this community. It offers so much wonderful information, and I give it 17 thumbs up.

The Pride video, among so many others, just prove to me that you’re just an overall amazing person (as if that wasn’t already established). You talk about topics in your videos so eloquently, and they are so freaking relateable it hurts. I mean that in the most positive way of hurt though. You are one of the few human beings on this planet that can bring together such a diverse community and they all get along (which is hard to do in the age of the internet!). I think that just goes to show that there are just people in this world meant to make an impact, and I fully believe you are one of them.

You are such an inspiration – you are so wonderful and kind and understanding, but I don’t feel like these words really do it justice. You have a platform thanks to Vine and YouTube that you are using for all the right reasons. You are using your channel to educate, to inform, to make people feel like they have a safe space to exist as themselves fully.

I don’t think I can every thank you enough for just being who you are, and expressing yourself in such a raw, honest and educational way. You have impacted so many people, including me. Hopefully if you ever go on tour again, I can find a way to come to your show and thank you in person.

Never stop educating people. Even if one day you stop making videos, I hope you continue to positively impact the lives of everyone you meet. I have high hopes you’ll do that though, because…like I said, I think it’s just part of who you are.

Thank you again for all you do, you have no idea how much it means to people like me!

Sincerely,

A Pan Fander

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

In The News: Philadelphia’s Gay Pride Flag

Let’s not sugar coat this: the LGBTQ community, and much of America, is in an uproar right now over Philly’s recent addition to the rainbow flag. If you haven’t heard, they added a brown and black stripe to the flag to help represent LGBTQ people of color. And I’m sure by now you’ve read countless articles both for and against this addition, and heard countless reasons for why each side thinks they are more right than the other.

But, in case you weren’t aware of all that happening, we here at #Fearless wanted to take the time educate not just our readers, but ourselves, on why the change was made, and what it truly symbolized. So, instead of you rummaging around the internet in search of clues, leave that to the trusty people of #Fearless!

The History of the LGBTQ Flag*

So, in order to understand the importance of the rainbow flag we need to go back. Way back, to the 1970s when the first rainbow flag was widely accepted as a symbol of the LGBTQ community. Created by San Francisco artist Gilbert Baker in 1978, the rainbow flag was debuted as a way to symbolize unity and diversity in the gay community.

However, the rainbow flag has been been around for much longer, and there are many variations of it from all over the world. One in particular is from 1922, when the Cooperative Movement designed a seven color rainbow flag that helped honor Co-operators Day. However, the design wasn’t decided on until two years later, and wasn’t officially adopted as the official symbol of the international cooperative movement until 1925.

The colors, decided on by a french professor and famous cooperator, Professor Charles Gide, said that the “rainbow symbolized unity in diversity and the power of light, enlightenment and progress.”

More specifically, the colors have the following meanings according to the Co-Operative movement:

  • Red: Courage
  • Orange: Vision of Possibilities
  • Yellow: The challenge that GREEN has kindled
  • Green: Challenge to co-operators to strive for growth and understanding
  • Light Blue: Far horizons, the need to provide education and help less fortunate people; to strive towards global unity
  • Dark Blue: Suggests pessimism; a reminder that less fortunate people have needs that need to be met
  • Violet: Warmth, beauty and friendship

This rainbow flag is still being used, but since April 2001, they have put their logo on it to help avoid confusion in other countries. Throughout history, there have been many more instances of the rainbow flag, and many variations of it, being used to symbolize peace, unity and hope.

But, we’re talking about the one for the LGBTQ community, so let’s get back to that. When Gilbert Baker created the rainbow flag in 1978, it originally had 8 colors: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, pink and turquoise. However, as it became mass produced, they took out pink and turquoise and left it with the six other colors.

The colors, as a whole, symbolize diversity in the gay community, and how despite it being made up of so many different people, genders, races and more, they could come together united. Individually, the colors of the rainbow flag have tremendous symbolism too:

  • Red: Life
  • Orange: Healing
  • Yellow: Sunlight
  • Green: Nature
  • Blue: Harmony/Peace
  • Purple/Violet: Spirit

The removed colors of Turquoise and Pink stood for art/magic and sexuality, respectively. Probably less known is that during the 1980s and 1990s, a black stripe was sometimes added to the iconic design to represent AIDS victims.

At it’s core, the LGBTQ Rainbow Flag has always been about diversity. It’s a flag that was created to acknowledge all races, all ethnicities, all genders, all sexualities. Even outside of the LGBTQ community, the flag is used to symbolize peace, cooperation and diversity.

*All information for the above section was found on Wikipedia. Yes, I know, I hear the chorus of high school teachers everywhere screaming in unison.

Philly Adds Black/Brown Stripes to LGBT Flag

Now comes the part where we talk about the highly debated topic of Philadelphia adding black and brown stripes to the iconic LGBTQ Rainbow Flag. According to various sources, Philedelphia added these two colors to “represent inclusion of people of color in the LGBTQ Community.” This decision to alter the flag for Philedelphia’s Pride Festival came because of a very important reason: the need to fight against the city’s major problem with racial discrimination in the LGBTQ community.

The racism issue in Philadelphia has been a large enough problem that it has lead to investigations and anti-racism training in many of the cities gay bars – 11 to be exact. Philadelphia’s well meaning additions to the flag served to help spark the conversation within their community about this issue – and boy, did it.

Amber Hikes, the executive director of Philadelphia’s Office of LGBTQ Affairs, said this about the addition of the black and brown stripe: “It’s a push for people to start listening to people of color in our community, start hearing what they are saying.”

Since the debut of the flag, there has been considerable black lash in Philadelphia, which has been predominantly from gay white men. According to Hikes, it poses a very large question of whether or not white gay men are aware of the intense discrimination and racism that takes place in their city to gay POC.

This flag is also just another of the countless alternate designs to the iconic symbol. It is not something that is being officially adopted nationally or internationally as the new LGBTQ flag, but was created with the intention of addressing concerns specifically in Philadelphia’s LGBTQ scene.

The #Fearless Opinion

I’ll admit that before writing this article, I hadn’t done much research into this issue. Despite the fact that I strongly support both causes that the Philly gay pride flag was representing, I had almost made a conscious decision to just spout off my opinion without doing the necessary leg work.

The spark note version of that opinion was this: if it it ain’t broke don’t fix it. The LGBTQ rainbow flag was never something that symbolized race, so I just assumed that making it about race was completely unnecessary. Did I understand why it was being done? Not really, but I knew that changing something that had been so iconic in the LGBTQ community seemed wrong, especially when the flag had always been a symbol of mass diversity and inclusivity.

It wasn’t until I did my research that I realized I had probably made an ass of myself on one too many statuses, and that I had inadvertently made myself part of the problem.

I had no idea that there was such an extreme disparity in the LGBTQ community regarding POC, in Philly or otherwise. I also didn’t realize that this variation of the flag had such an important meaning to the Philly gay community.

The addition of the brown and black stripes to Philly’s flag actually makes so much sense now, and I personally can’t understand why we’re all up in arms about it. Just a few minutes of research and actually reading articles turned up a completely valid reason for this change. Whether or not you believe that there is a problem with gay POC in Philly being discriminated against, that’s not for you to decide.

If you don’t live in Philly, and you aren’t a gay POC , you honestly don’t have a lot of say in whether or not there is in fact a racism and discrimination problem in Philly’s LGBTQ community. In fact, I’ll broaden it up and say that if you aren’t a gay POC, you can’t really tell someone there isn’t an issue in the LGBTQ community with racism and discrimination as a whole.

It bears repeating, so I’ll say it again: unless you are a gay POC, you have no right to dismiss their struggles; and even as a gay POC, if you have never been victimized, you have no right to dismiss the struggles of another gay POC who may have been.

I think Philly adding the black and brown stripe for their personal pride event was an amazing gesture to acknowledging a real problem in their community. It shows that they hear the struggles, they see how it’s affecting people, and they want to make a change. It’s extremely heartwarming to see it handled this way, and I stand with their decision to make the addition.

Even if you can’t grasp the concept of nationwide discrimination and racism (in general, not just in the LGBTQ community), lower your scope and just zoom in on Philadelphia. The people who commissioned this change know the people, they know what’s happening, and they see the struggle. Even if you don’t think this flag should become the national symbol for LGBTQ people, why can’t we just appreciate one city doing right by its people? How is that so hard for us, as a human race, to understand?

Their decisions impact their community, and we have no right to sit behind our keyboards mercilessly screaming about how angry we are about it if you have absolutely no connection to the LGBTQ community, gay POC, or Philly. Yet, here we are, discussing something that shouldn’t even be an issue, truthfully.

In fact, what is extremely upsetting is just how many people (myself included before this article) are so quick to pass judgement on a situation they know nothing of. You can’t just read a couple headlines and claim to understand. You can’t just go spouting off your opinion on a matter that you’ve done nothing to research. Since when did you being offended about something mean we have to invalidate and silence the struggles of others we know nothing of?

If people took more time to actually understand, and less time getting offended over what they think the problem is (when in actuality it’s completely different), we’d probably have a much more rational nation. But, it’s not that simple and never will be that simple, unfortunately.

You can draw your own conclusions of whether or not you think the additions are needed, but for this girl? I say leave Philly alone, they did an amazing thing for their community.

So, do you agree or disagree with us here at #Fearless? Let us know your opinion on the matter in the comments below!

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

Why I Decided To Come Out

I just spent about two hours trying to craft the perfectly written article for all the reasons why I decided to come out, what factors went in to deciding if I should, and all that jazz. I sat down to read what I wrote and immediately said I didn’t like it. I scrapped it all, and what you’re reading now is what I think is more important.

You want to know why I came out? Because I wanted to.

It’s really that simple, and all the long winded babbling for a more in depth reason seems unnecessary. I came out because I wanted to accept myself and be proud of who I was. That should be the end of the discussion, but that’d make for a pretty lame post, wouldn’t it?

When I sat down to publish my Finding #Fearless article on pansexuality, I was nervous; nervous for a lot of reasons. There was the what if of what my friends and family would say (would they even care? had they always known?). Then there was this fear of publicly announcing a part of yourself that you had only recently accepted too. That kind of honesty makes you feel very vulnerable, and that can be scary for someone who isn’t used to it.

I’ve spent all my life not knowing myself. I’ve had people always telling me who to be, how to act, what to think; and for the first time in my life that barrier was broken down. I was able to finally peer into my own soul and recognize myself for who I am.

That process is extremely overwhelming, and identifying as pansexual was a huge first step that led me down a path of self discovery. I realized that I could safely embrace who I was without fear of being criticized or abandoned. I realized that for the first time in my entire life, I was free to just be who I knew I was without judgement or punishment. I could have my own thoughts, my own voice, my own personality, and that’s a very freeing realization. Overwhelming, sure, but also very exhilarating.

When I decided to come out, whether it was a conscious decision or not, it was because for the first time in my life I was able to connect with that part of me. I was finally beginning to see who I was, without the fear of someone telling me I was wrong.

I came out not just because I wanted to, but there must have been a part of me that really needed it, too. Everyday that I proudly display who I am, I feel my confidence rise. I finally feel like I know my entire self, and that’s the most amazing feeling.

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

What Is Pansexuality & Other Important Questions!

I’ve been waiting for a burst of inspiration on the best way to approach this post. When I wrote my #Finding Fearless article on my pansexuality I briefly touched on the definition, but there were so many small points I wanted to mention that didn’t seem to fit in that story. So, I figured in honor of #Fearless’s first Pride Week, I’d go ahead and elaborate a little more on the points I didn’t get to mention before.

Some of these points, while aimed specifically at pansexuality (because there’s not a lot out there in the ways of information) can be applicable to anyone in the LGBTQ+ community.

Disclaimer: All information that I put into this article is either based on research I have done, or my own personal experiences. All I can do is talk from that perspective, so please leave me a comment if you feel that I got something wrong, or you would like to help explain something better that I did!

What is pansexuality? Pansexuality (also known as omnisexuality) literally means an attraction to all genders. Many pansexuals may tell you that they are gender blind, meaning that gender does not play a role in their ability to start a relationship. When I say I’m pansexual, I mean I’m gender blind. When I fall for someone, their gender and what they identify as has no bearing on my ability to maintain a relationship; their heart, soul and being do. Your personality plays a bigger role, to me, than your gender or sexuality.

I’ve liked a gay guy (to be fair, I didn’t realize he was gay until he told me, but I still really liked him even after he told me), straight girls, and everything in between. Most of those crushes didn’t go very far, but my attraction knew no bounds. I’m currently in a wonderful relationship with a wonderful man, but him being a man is not why I love him. I love him because he is amazing and he makes me feel loved, appreciated and so darn happy. His gender and identity have nothing to do with it, and that realization was how I discovered my pansexuality.

How is pansexuality different than bisexuality? Bisexuality is the sexual attraction to two or more genders; it can also be defined as the attraction to the opposite gender and another one that isn’t necessarily the same gender.  However, to me, the biggest distinction is that bisexuals typically have very specific gender preferences, whereas pansexuals typically don’t. This isn’t always the case, but in most of my discussions with other pans and bisexuals, that seems to be the biggest difference.

Can bisexuality and pansexuality be used interchangeably? I guess that depends on who you ask. Some people will tell you that saying they are bisexual is easier than pansexual, because people understand bisexuality far easier than pansexuality. They also might tell you they will identify as bisexual (instead of pan) because there is a bigger support system and a better wealth of knowledge out there on bisexuality. Then, there are people who say that all pans are actually bi because pansexuality lives under the bisexual umbrella, and that using them as the same sexual orientation is fine. My personal take on this is that panseuxality and bisexuality are quite different, and it’s not something I would use in place of the other.

If pansexuals are gender blind and prefer personality, doesn’t that actually make them demisexual? No! Demisexuals require a deep, emotional bond to become sexually attracted to someone. This means that demisexuals usually will not be sexually active in a relationship if they don’t feel they have the right connection. Pansexuals, while they don’t focus on gender and focus more heavily on personality, don’t usually require a strong emotional connection to start a sexual relationship and while it could be different for any one, I personally had no problems feeling sexually attracted to people without a strong emotional bond.

I think I’m pansexual but I don’t know because I’ve only dated people of the opposite gender. Do I have to date every gender to call myself pan? Absolutely not! Trust how you feel, because who you date has no bearing on how you identify. I’ve only ever dated men (and messed around with one women) but I know I’m pansexual. How? Because who I am is undeniable, I just had to accept it. Don’t let someone ever tell you that being pan, bi, ace, etc. is something defined by what you have or haven’t done. If you know in your heart that you are pan, trust that feeling.

I’m dating someone who is pansexual. Are they more likely to cheat? The short answer is no – pansexuality doesn’t impact your partners loyalty levels. Of course, I can’t speak for your significant other, but pansexuals are no more likely to cheat than anyone else. Just because we could fall for anyone, doesn’t mean we can or will, or that our attraction will be reciprocated. My advice is, trust your partner, and if they cheat it’s not because they’re pansexual or otherwise, it’s because they are a terrible human being and you deserve better. Okay, that’s not a fair assumption to make because I don’t know them, but don’t cheat  it’s not nice!

I want to come out as pansexual, any suggestions on how to do that? There are two things you should consider before coming out, whether that’s as pansexual or otherwise:

  1. Your personal safety
  2. Your personal comfort level

If you don’t feel like you will be safe by coming out (for example: you could get thrown out, hurt, or bullied because of it), please make sure you have a plan in place to keep you safe. If you feel like not coming out will be more detrimental than coming out, just be sure you have the right plan of action set up in the case of a fall out. Have a friend or supportive family member aware that you’re doing this and that you may need them once it’s done, or, if at all possible, wait until you are about to start life on your own. Your safety should be a top priority, and coming out to those who may not understand could be more emotionally taxing than waiting for the right and safest moment.

You also should consider how comfortable you are with your sexuality before you come out. Be prepared that people may not understand, or that strangers, despite have an extremely supportive group of friends (and hopefully family), may still be cruel to you. But, in my experience, if you are confident and proud of who you are, it doesn’t entirely matter what those people say. Coming out, for me, was more of a decree of personal acceptance. I was announcing that I had finally accepted a part of myself that had been with me since high school, and I honestly didn’t care what anyone had to say about it. If I lost a friend, they weren’t my friend to begin with. If my family members ridiculed me, I know that I can handle that because I’m confident and happy with who I am.

My suggestion is, if you want to come out but aren’t sure how it will be received, find a couple safe friends or a LGBTQ+ community on Facebook to come out to first. Test the waters, get used to saying that you are pansexual (or bisexual, or gay, or ace, or anything of the sorts). Get confident in your ability to mange the nerves that come from opening up about it the first time. Even saying it to a group of people who just get you can be nerve wracking, not because of the fear they won’t accept you, but because it’s the first time you’ve proclaimed something you’ve felt inside to the world. That’s pretty terrifying, but it gets easier the more you say it and the more you are positively received.

Also, this is just a good thing to keep in mind: understand who you are and what your sexuality is. Make sure you prepare for people to ask you questions about what pansexuality is. You can’t change how they view it overnight or ever help them truly understand if they refuse to open their minds, but if you can prepare for questions it’ll help you and them in the long run. Again, confidence is key here – and if you are confident in yourself and how you feel, it’ll show them this is something more than just a “phase” (ugh, I hate that).

So be safe, be smart, and be brave are my biggest tips. If you ever need a safe person to come out to, we at #Fearless are hear to listen to you and support you!

Do I have to label myself? Why can’t we just accept who we are without the extra baggage? You absolutely don’t have to label yourself, and many people feel that same way! Just feel how you feel, and don’t stress about figuring out the label if you don’t want to. For me, having a label meant I could appropriately understand and accept a part of me that I hadn’t been able to understand for so long. But, the label itself doesn’t really change how I feel, it just allowed me to find out more information and reach out to people who are also pansexual.

I’m in a committed relationship and/or older, but I just realized how I feel is pansexuality. Is it worth coming out? That has to be your decision, but the same rules apply here as they do if you are coming out earlier on or as a single person. Be smart, be safe and weigh whether or not you feel that coming out is going to help you be a better version of yourself. Realizing your pansexual late in life (or even well past the days of being able to explore it) sometimes feels strange. You are coming into a part of you that, while there likely most of your life, has finally burst from behind the seams. You’re officially navigating this self discovery process in a much more overwhelming way than if you started discovering it younger or before you were in a committed relationship. In the end, you have to be happy, and if you can accept who you are without coming out, you don’t have to. If you think that being open and honest, as well as labeling your sexuality, is going to be beneficial to you and your relationship, so be it! Your decision has to be weighed on how safe you feel and what you feel will make you happiest, and I can’t decide that for you!

I hope that this has been helpful to you in understanding more about panseuxality, or just commonly asked questions in general. Being pansexual is still something I’m navigating, but I love being open and sharing this information to help others. Got a question you want to ask that we left out here? Leave it in the comments!

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

#Fearless QOTW: June 19-June 25

This week’s quote was chosen by Chelsie S., writer and owner of #Fearless. See what it is and why she chose it below:

Insta OTW June 19“I couldn’t think of a better quote to kick off #Fearless’s Pride Week than this one. With so many powerful quotes out there that spoke to me, I chose this one… in part to my love of Glee and Chris Colfer, and also because I resonated with this on so many levels. You are wonderful and beautiful and perfect. Period. How you feel, who you love, what you want in life is not the problem. Be proud of who you are, because it’s not you that makes the world act this way. Be brave in the pursuit of discovering who you are and what you want for yourself. Once you latch on to what makes you happy and confident, you will never lose that sparkle. Don’t let the negativity of this world lessen your shine. You are wonderful just the way you are.”

Do you want to be featured on #Fearless? It’s as simple as sending in your favorite inspirational quote, poetry verse, movie quote or song lyric, and explaining why you love it! To submit a quote, please visit the #Fearless QOTW submission page, or email the quote, the author and why you chose it to contact@hashtagfearless.com.

We can’t wait to see what makes you feel #Fearless!

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

#Fearless Family: What To Expect From US Healthcare

By Lindsey LaForge
#Fearless Family Writer

Interacting with the healthcare system can be a daunting and anxiety provoking experience, especially if you’ve never done it on your own! Knowing what to expect ahead of time can help lessen some of that anxiety and uncertainty. This article discusses some of the common healthcare settings (in the United States) and answers some general questions to help you prepare!

Doctor’s Offices

How do I get a doctor? Do a quick internet search for your area or use your insurance company’s website to search for covered providers. Then, call and see if they are: a) accepting new patients, and b) accepting your insurance. If you don’t have insurance, some offices have programs in place to provide free or lower cost care. Don’t be afraid to call and ask!

My doctor’s office has a doctor and a nurse practitioner/physician’s assistant. Which one should I see? In a primary care setting, either is fine! Nurse practitioners or physicians assistants can do most of the same things a doctor can do (do an exam, diagnose you, prescribe medications, etc.). They receive lots of education just like doctors do and they receive regular supervision. That being said; if you aren’t comfortable seeing them, don’t be afraid to speak up and request to see doctor!

When should I got to the doctor?
When you join a new office: Call and schedule an appointment to meet with your new doctor. They will want to have information on your history, medications, and other relevant health problems to have on file for when you need to go in the future.

When you are sick: Call the office and explain what’s going on. The receptionist may need to consult with a nurse and may request to call you back. Typically they will be able to schedule you within a day or two.

After regular business hours: If you aren’t having an emergency, most doctor’s offices have on-call phone lines. Check to see if they have a special line for after hours. If they don’t, call the regular number and it should give you an option to speak to a nurse. The nurse will listen to your explanation of symptoms then a) explain what they think is going on, and b) give you a recommendation on further treatment (i.e. calling and making an appointment in the morning, going to the emergency room, etc.).

What happens when I arrive at the doctor’s office? Start by walking up to the receptionist’s desk and giving them your name. They may ask for your insurance information or give you paperwork to fill out. You will wait in a waiting area until the nurse comes out to bring you back. The nurse will call your name and bring you into the office. They will often take your height, weight, blood pressure, and pulse. Depending on what type of appointment it is, they may ask you to change into a hospital gown before the doctor comes in. (They will give you privacy and the doctor will knock before they enter the room).

I’m nervous about talking to my doctor. What should I say? Be honest. Doctors are not judgmental and they have heard it all before! Be sure to include all your symptoms and answer their questions the best you can. They will likely ask you if you have any other questions or concerns before they leave. Feel free to bring anything else up when they ask, they really do want to know! Once the doctor has finished the exam and discussed your treatment options, they will take you back to the waiting room or check-out area. Every office is different, but the they may ask you for a co-payment or to schedule future appointments at this time.

Hospitals

I have to go to the emergency room and I’m scared! What should I expect? If you haven’t arrived by ambulance, start by walking up to the receptionist and giving them your name and giving a general description of your symptoms. Most likely you will be given paperwork to fill out. Find a seat in the waiting room. A nurse will come out (depending on how busy it is will depend how long this takes) and bring you into a triage room. In the triage room, they are assessing you to determine your needs (i.e. how quickly you need to be seen). They may take your vitals (blood pressure, pulse, etc.) and ask you to describe your symptoms. They may give you a hospital bracelet or take your insurance information at this time.

Once you’ve met with the triage nurse, they will ask you to continue waiting in the waiting room until you can be seen. Depending on the severity of the reason you are at the ER will determine how long it takes until you are seen. Be as patient as you can be. When it is your turn, a nurse will come and get you and bring you into the ER. Depending on the hospital, you may be in a physical room or an area divided by a curtain/glass door. Your room will likely have a stretcher, not a bed. You may or may not have a sink or tv. Some rooms have bathrooms, but most places have shared bathrooms in the hallways.

Don’t be afraid to ask the nurses where the bathroom is or for any other need you have. Due to the many different reasons for visiting the ER, it is not possible to explain exactly what will happen once you reach your room. You may have blood taken, you may be asked to give a urine sample, you may be asked to put on a hospital gown. Sometimes they will ask you not to eat or drink until they determine your needs. It may be a long wait until the doctor is able to see you, but don’t be afraid to ask your nurse for things you need!

I have to stay overnight at the hospital, what will happen? Depending on how you arrived at the hospital (planned, from the ER, etc.) will determine how you arrive at your room. Once you arrive, your nurse will come in and help you get settled. They will take your vitals and give you some information about what you can expect. You may or may not have roommate. Each room will have a curtain so you can’t see your roommate, although you will be able to hear them. Your nurse will tell you what you are allowed to and not allowed to do (i.e. getting out of bed, visiting the bathroom, etc.).

You will have a call button and are always allowed to call for a nurse if you have any concerns or needs. A nurse will likely be in and out of your room throughout the day and the night to check on you. Your doctor will visit to check on you, but not as frequently as your nurses. Hospitals have visiting hours so you will be able to have friends/family come into the room with you during these times. You will have access to a telephone and a tv to use whenever you like. They may or may not allow you to use your cell phone (depending on what machines are present). You may hear things over an intercom.

Sometimes these are pages to doctors/staff and sometimes they are codes. Codes alert staff to different situations throughout the hospital (such as a medical emergency, a fire, a behavioral challenge, etc.). Don’t be frightened if you hear these. The staff knows how to handle them!

Mental Health System

How do I find a counselor? Similar to finding a new doctor: Do a quick internet search for your area. Use your insurance company’s website to search for covered providers. Call and see if they are a) accepting new patients and b) accepting your insurance.

I found a counselor, now what? Call or if available, fill out a form online. They will ask you for your name and to describe some of the symptoms or concerns you are having. If it’s a location with multiple counselors, they may give you options as to who you’d like to see (male or female, etc.).

I have my first appointment today, what do I do? Arrive early to your first appointment, because they will have you fill out paperwork. Be sure to answer any questions the paperwork asks honestly. No one reading it will be judging you. Once inside your counselor’s office you may see multiple places to sit. Sit wherever you feel comfortable. During this first appointment, the counselor is going to ask lots of questions. They will ask you to describe why you are there, your past history, any medications you take, and other general questions.

After the counselor has finished this initial paperwork you may have time to begin discussing the reason you’ve scheduled the appointment. If not, your counselor may summarize some of the things they feel they are able to help you with and ask if you are interested in scheduling future appointments.

Other helpful tips for beginning counseling: Feel free to bring a friend or family member with you for moral support. You may feel comfortable having them in the appointment with you or you may want them to wait in the waiting room. If you tend to get anxious when talking, bring something to do with your hands (a fidget toy, a rock to hold in your pocket, a coloring book, etc.). Sometimes counselors have things to fiddle with in their offices. Write down what you’d like to discuss before you arrive. This will help you stay on track and remember your concerns if you get nervous or overwhelmed.

You may have an instant connection with your counselor and you may not. If you can afford to, try giving it three sessions before determining if you feel you and your counselor are a good match. Not all counselors/clients have a good connection and sometimes it takes time to shop around and find the right match. Don’t be afraid to tell your counselor that you’d rather see someone else. That is 100% your right.

I’m going to the ER in crisis, what’s going to happen? You will begin your visit the same way as someone visiting the ER for a medical reason. If you are able to prepare ahead of time, feel free to bring a friend and/or a comfort object (such as a stuffed animal or favorite book). Once you arrive in your room, you may be asked to put on a hospital gown and give them all your personal items and/or things that could be dangerous (including your cell phone, any sharp items, your shoe laces, etc.) You will receive a psychiatric evaluation, where you will be asked about your symptoms, your thoughts, and if you are feeling suicidal.

Be honest with them. Once the psychiatrist has evaluated you, they will decide where you will go from there. You may be discharged with medications or recommendations to find a counselor or you may be admitted to an inpatient unit. If they determine you need to be admitted into an inpatient unit, they will have to search for an available location for you. This may take a long time. If you are going to a different location from the ER, you will be transported in an ambulance for your safety.

I’m being admitted to an inpatient unit. What will it be like? Inpatient units are locked units. This means you are not able to leave without permission. However, permission can often be earned by proving you are remaining safe. You will not be allowed to have anything dangerous, including sharp objects, medications, cell phones, etc. You may or may not have a roommate. The bathrooms are usually locked and you may need to ask a staff member to unlock them for you. You may have staff members checking on you frequently to make sure you are safe. You will meet with psychiatrists, counselors, social workers, nurses, and other professionals throughout your stay.

Be honest with them and don’t be afraid to tell them how you are feeling or asking for things you may need. During your stay, you may be trying new medications to help control your symptoms. Each unit is different, but most places have daily activities to participate in including discussion groups, crafts, exercises, and other therapeutic activities. Participating in these is important to your treatment and it fills your time! You are allowed to use the phone (though rules may vary place to place) and you are allowed to have visitors during specific hours. If you are feeling uncomfortable, scared, unsafe, or anything else that concerns you, tell a staff member. They are there to help you and want to see you feel better!

Thank you to Lindsey for sharing this incredibly informative story!

If you would like to join the #Fearless Family, please visit the #Fearless Family page for more information on submission guidelines!

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

Thank You For A Successful MHAM Fundraiser!

I’m so very excited to be writing this post, because #Fearless’s Mental Health Awareness Month Fundraiser was a huge success. For those who did not know, from May 1 to May 31, #Fearless ran two fundraisers: one being a t-shirt sale, and the other being a local baking fundraiser. These two together made up a huge effort to raise as much money as possible for The Trevor Project, and organization that helps with crisis intervention and suicide prevention in LGBTQ+ teens.

In total, we raised $445 for The Trevor Project, which doubled the amount of money that was made last year ($220). Not only was I completely floored at how well this did, it just proves that this world isn’t as bad as it sometimes seems. It’s my hope that next year, no matter what the vessel of fundraising is, that we can hit $500 for another great organization!

I love to raise awareness and funds for organizations whenever I can. If I could, I’d donate almost all my money to charity, but I just don’t have that ability. This world is in need of love and kindness, so please make sure, even if you can’t donate to help an organization directly, you can help by spreading positivity, love and empathy to all who walk this earth.

Did you order a shirt, mug, hoodie, sticker or something from our bake sale? If you did, send the picture to contact@hashtagfearless.com! We would love to see you showing off your pride for this wonderful cause.

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

Let’s Do Away With The Phrase “Normal People”

It should come as no shock to any of you that I’m a huge mental health advocate. I work very hard to promote the normality of mental health, and lifting those up who feel like they are less than or broken because of those struggles. I run a support group on Facebook for emetophobia, and every day I interact with people who feel like their phobia makes them worthless, disgusting and undeserving (but, spoiler alert: it doesn’t!).

However, it hit me while I was commenting on a post recently how, despite my best efforts to normalize mental health, I too have fallen victim to making myself (and likely others) still feel less than. I do this by referring to non-emets (and non-anxiety sufferers) as “normal people” and I think it’s time we changed that.

Because, really, what the hell is normal anyways?

I once had an abnormal psych professor in college who challenged us to figure out what “normal” was. He told us normal is a lie (of course I’m sure he said it a little nicer than that), and every single one of us is abnormal and that it’s okay. Essentially, the TL;DR? version is abnormality is normal, and he challenged us to embrace our flaws as positive parts of ourselves.

This concept is still very strange to me as well, because I still lament about the idea of what’s normal. Anxiety exasperates this need for normality, constantly questioning if how I’m feeling, what I’m doing, or what I’m experiencing is “normal” for people.

My husband has to constantly remind me, “What’s normal for you may not be normal for other people. Stop comparing yourself!” Sometimes his ability to help me goes completely unseen until I realize it myself, and I know it just drives him up the wall. But this statement is incredibly true, and something I’m actively trying to work into my daily self-affirmations.

Because, truly, your “normal” isn’t going to be the same as neighbor Jimmy’s normal, or even the same as your best friend Mary’s normal. Your normal is whatever works for you. It’s your special self-care routine, it’s knowing exactly how much social interaction you can have before shutting down, and realizing that your little quirks that help you manage a panic attack don’t make you weak – they make you self aware.

Just because you have a mental illness doesn’t mean that you are less than someone who doesn’t. The mental health community at large is constantly advocating for a better understanding and stopping the stigma, yet we are sometimes the ones perpetuating the very concept we are fighting against. To say that someone without anxiety, depression or other mental health disorder is “normal” is feeding this idea that you are less than. Stop that, because you are wonderful, worthy and special.

So now? We change the script.

Instead of saying that someone without mental health issues is normal, just refer to them as someone without anxiety. Say they are a “non-anxiety sufferer” or a “non-emet”; call them for what they are, not what your mind sees them as.

Using the word normal in these instances isn’t something that is going to go away, but instead of seeing normal as a standard that you are trying to achieve, see it as something that you already are and are already owning. Just because you are different than someone else doesn’t mean you aren’t normal, it just means that your reality and their reality are different, and both of those realities are normal.

Being different doesn’t make us flawed, it makes us special. Embrace what makes you normal, and do away with the logic that your mental illness makes you less than.

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.

 

#Fearless QOTW: June 12-June 18

This week’s QOTW was chosen by Chelsie S., owner of #Fearless. See why she chose it and what it is below:

Insta QOTW June 12“This quote is one of those that just spoke to me when I saw it. When I look back on my life, I lived most of my days in a state of ‘I can’t do this because it’s too scary; too dangerous; too unknown.’ That kind of mindset meant I missed out on so many wonderful experiences, many of which I may never get again. It wasn’t until recently that I adopted a ‘I’d rather do it and regret it than never have tried at all’ kind of attitude. Since then, my entire world has changed. I’ve done so many new and exciting things, met so many people, and learned so much more about myself. Everything you could ever want for yourself is just one step beyond your comfort zone, but be careful: the moment you take that leap is the day you can never look back. You will be addicted to pushing your boundaries, but it’ll be the best decision you’ve ever made.”

Do you want to be featured on #Fearless? It’s as simple as sending in your favorite inspirational quote, poetry verse, movie quote or song lyric, and explaining why you love it! To submit a quote, please visit the #Fearless QOTW submission page, or email the quote, the author and why you chose it to contact@hashtagfearless.com.

We can’t wait to see what makes you feel #Fearless!

If you would like to email #Fearless, you can send any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions to contact@hashtagfearless.com. We do our best to respond within 48 hours, but if for some reason we cannot get back to you in that time frame, we promise we will always respond as soon as possible. You can also find us on any of the following social media sites: FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram!

Lastly, we run an Emetophobia Support Group on Facebook. Emetophobia is the intense and irrational fear of throwing up, and it is one struggle we are passionately engaged in. It is a closed, by request only group to help facilitate sharing and support by all members. It is also private, meaning that the posts you and others make will not show up publicly in your newsfeed.