All posts filed under: Mental Illness

Finding #Fearless: The Epilogue, Part Two

This is part one of a two part follow up to my series Finding #Fearless. Names and locations have been changed to protect identities.  Epilogue, Part One | Epilogue, Part Two After only seeing my therapist twice in two months, I walked in to my appointment in September feeling different about being there. He asked me, “How are things going, let’s get an update on the past month?” I took a moment, and that’s when I told him: “I don’t know, I just don’t feel like I need to be here today.” That’s actually pretty freaking huge. About a month ago my therapist declared me recovered from emetophobia. It was a very odd transition, because I had literally just started getting back to a normal state of mind. And, not soon after that, I started to have anxiety flare ups again that made me start to question if I could really be recovered. Did he speak too soon, or did I bite the bait too quickly? What if I wasn’t ready to be deemed recovered and …

Finding #Fearless: The Epilogue, Part One

This is part one of a two part follow up to my series Finding #Fearless. Names and locations have been changed to protect identities.  Epilogue, Part One | Epilogue, Part Two This article does discuss topics that may be triggering to those struggling with depression, suicidal thoughts or self harm. If you ever feel like you need hope in a time of darkness, please call 1-800-273-8255. Usually epilogues find themselves nestled safely at the tail end of any published story that warrants one. They don’t typically surface many months or years down the road, but in the case of my story, the epilogue is a bit fashionably late. When I sat down to begin this site, I opened up the inner workings of my mind, and shared six unique, but intricately intertwined, stories of how #Fearless came to be more than just a webpage, but my way of life. I explored my childhood, my teenage years, my anxiety, my self harm, my sexuality, my fears and my hopes. This carefully crafted journey through my life …

#Fearless’s Simple Steps To Practicing Self-Care

Self-care is something I have written about thousands of time in the history of #Fearless, and it’s something that I will continue to write about for the rest of time because it’s so freaking important. Not just for people with mental health issues, but for every single human being on the planet. I don’t care if you’re 100% healthy, everyone gets stressed sometimes. Work, life and human responsibilities take a lot out of you. Dedicating 30 minutes, an hour, a day to focusing on what you know you need, versus your responsibilities, really can make a difference. In the past I’ve written about the importance of self-care but I’ve never really given you the key steps to finding what you need to be doing for self-care. I figured, in light of this, why not offer you my tips on how to find the best self-care routine for you! Step One: Assess the mental, physical and emotional state you’re currently in. Before proper self-care can be done, you have to be able to look inside yourself …

5 Things Millennials Need To Stop Feeling Bad About

I feel, as millennials, we get a lot of crap. Whether it’s headlines about what we’ve “killed” or for simply being “entitled” or “lazy”, we just can’t seem to get any positive praise from the generations before us. Yes, I’m looking at you, Baby Boomers. But, in the midst of all this chaos, it got me thinking how many times I’ve felt bad for simply making choices that seem to be bettering my mental, physical, emotional state because of said headline writers and Baby Boomers. The constant tug of war of doing what I know is right, versus doing things “the way it’s always been” has never been a bigger issue than it is now for millennials. And, to be honest, I’m downright tired of it, so here’s a list of 5 very important things that millennials (or really, anyone) need to stop apologizing for and feeling bad for, like, yesterday: Your relationship status. Listen here, fellow millennials. Just because your great, great, great Grandma Sally Mae was married at the age of 17 doesn’t …

7 Awesome Anxiety Reducing Items (& Alternatives!) To Keep At Your Desk!

If you’re like me, working a desk job and having anxiety are two inevitabilities of life. I get up, go to work, and sometimes my buddy anxiety is right there with me. Other times, they show up after a stressful day, or right before a deadline. Either way, I’ve just learned that life with anxiety is going to happen, so why not be prepared? This got me thinking about ways I can best equip my desk with items that will help me in the midst of anxiety. While not a comprehensive list, I’ve compiled a list of seven awesome anxiety reducing items to keep at your desk, for your reading pleasure. Essential Oil Defuser: I feel like as an anxiety sufferer, essential oils are just part of my calm down process. I use Eucalyptus and Mint, together usually, to help me relax and get to my “calm place”. This “calm place” is a meditation I do to help me get grounded again during a panic attack, and that meditation is attached to those scents. So, having …

Can You (& I) Be Addicted To Chaos?

“I feel like something is missing from my life, maybe it’s time for a change…” This is a VERY common phrase my husband is tired of hearing. I’ll bet, as I wrote that sentence, he compulsively put his head in his hands and doesn’t know why. In fact, it’s a phrase that’s probably more common than my wailing of “Ugh, I’m soooo boooorrreeeddd” or “Whats for *insert meal time here*?” No, that was a joke, there’s not much I say more than those two, I promise you that. But in a conversation the other day, I told my husband I don’t get why I keep feeling like this. Life is going pretty well for me right now. I have a good, steady job; I’m in the process of creating a from home bakery; I have a fairly decent social life; so whats the deal? Why am I feeling like I need to shake it up? The first thing I always go to is my job. Maybe it’s my job that needs changing, but it’s not …

Recovery Is Not Easy

Recovery is not easy. Anyone who tells you that recovery is easy is a liar, and that’s coming from someone who considers herself an eternal optimist. I’m an advocate for empowering people through lifting them up, showing them the strength they possess to face the upcoming battles of mental health recovery; but sometimes being honest is better than being optimistic. Recovery is not easy, and sometimes it’s downright scary. It’s unnerving, it’s stressful, it’s exhausting. It’s a constant uphill battle, it’s slipping and falling, and having to set boundaries with people that you know aren’t helping you achieve your goal. It’s finding a way to know what you need to be your best self, all while maintaining some sense of normalcy. Recovery is finding the courage to get up and fight the same demons that beat you down yesterday, approaching with a new tactic and still failing. It’s realizing that sometimes to win a war, you have to fight the same battle over and over again, on different days, in different settings. When I started …

Introducing: Dear Fearless…

In an effort to keep this site new and diverse, we here at #Fearless are very excited to announce the newest addition to our weekly content: Dear Fearless… What is Dear Fearless? Simply put, it’s our version of an advice column. You, our readers, will submit questions anonymously to our advice columnist, Fearless, and then Fearless will give the best advice they can based on the information you gave them. Each week (likely Saturdays at 10:00 a.m. ET), we’ll publish a new advice column and hopefully help the world one article at a time. Once we have a couple questions lined up, we will start publishing them. We will post only when we receive requests for advice, but we hope to make this a weekly column very soon! So, if you want to submit to our new column, here’s what you need to know: All questions will be anonymous, and we suggest you use a creative pen name to sign off as so you know your question is being answered! If you can’t think of …

Thank You For A Successful MHAM Fundraiser!

I’m so very excited to be writing this post, because #Fearless’s Mental Health Awareness Month Fundraiser was a huge success. For those who did not know, from May 1 to May 31, #Fearless ran two fundraisers: one being a t-shirt sale, and the other being a local baking fundraiser. These two together made up a huge effort to raise as much money as possible for The Trevor Project, and organization that helps with crisis intervention and suicide prevention in LGBTQ+ teens. In total, we raised $445 for The Trevor Project, which doubled the amount of money that was made last year ($220). Not only was I completely floored at how well this did, it just proves that this world isn’t as bad as it sometimes seems. It’s my hope that next year, no matter what the vessel of fundraising is, that we can hit $500 for another great organization! I love to raise awareness and funds for organizations whenever I can. If I could, I’d donate almost all my money to charity, but I just …

Let’s Do Away With The Phrase “Normal People”

It should come as no shock to any of you that I’m a huge mental health advocate. I work very hard to promote the normality of mental health, and lifting those up who feel like they are less than or broken because of those struggles. I run a support group on Facebook for emetophobia, and every day I interact with people who feel like their phobia makes them worthless, disgusting and undeserving (but, spoiler alert: it doesn’t!). However, it hit me while I was commenting on a post recently how, despite my best efforts to normalize mental health, I too have fallen victim to making myself (and likely others) still feel less than. I do this by referring to non-emets (and non-anxiety sufferers) as “normal people” and I think it’s time we changed that. Because, really, what the hell is normal anyways? I once had an abnormal psych professor in college who challenged us to figure out what “normal” was. He told us normal is a lie (of course I’m sure he said it a …