All posts filed under: Chronic Illness

#Fearless Quote of the Week: July 24-July 30

This week’s quote was chosen by Chelsie S., writer for (and owner of) #Fearless. See what it is and why she chose it below: “This quote is something I feel like I need constant reminder of, especially in the realm of mental health. I think it’s easy to get caught up in the idea that we’re not moving fast enough, or not making enough progress, but every journey is different. You could take the tiniest steps, or spend several days contemplating each step, but as long as you keep pushing yourself towards your goal, and never give up, you’re doing all you can to help yourself. Don’t judge yourself based on how fast someone else recovered – your speed does not matter. Be gentle on yourself, you’re only human after all.” Do you want to be featured on #Fearless? It’s as simple as sending in your favorite inspirational quote, poetry verse, movie quote or song lyric, and explaining why you love it! To submit a quote, please visit the #Fearless QOTW submission page, or email the …

Introducing: Dear Fearless…

In an effort to keep this site new and diverse, we here at #Fearless are very excited to announce the newest addition to our weekly content: Dear Fearless… What is Dear Fearless? Simply put, it’s our version of an advice column. You, our readers, will submit questions anonymously to our advice columnist, Fearless, and then Fearless will give the best advice they can based on the information you gave them. Each week (likely Saturdays at 10:00 a.m. ET), we’ll publish a new advice column and hopefully help the world one article at a time. Once we have a couple questions lined up, we will start publishing them. We will post only when we receive requests for advice, but we hope to make this a weekly column very soon! So, if you want to submit to our new column, here’s what you need to know: All questions will be anonymous, and we suggest you use a creative pen name to sign off as so you know your question is being answered! If you can’t think of …

#Fearless Family: Coping Does Not Equal Better

By Leigh #Fearless Family Writer I suffer migraines. That sentence could end with any sort of chronic illness or pain. Arthritis. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Fibromyalgia. Cancer. The list goes on. I suffer… Many of us use this terminology because of the danger of using a different one. The real sentence is: I cope with migraines. You cope with pain. You cope with fatigue. You pick yourself up day after day and you get done what needs doing. You do either the same amount as someone who doesn’t deal with chronic illness or pain or you manage what you are capable of at that point in time. The reason “I cope” is so dangerous is that it begins a flood of well-wishing that becomes a tipping point into expectation. “You’re doing great!” “I’m so glad to see how well you’re doing!” “It’s fantastic how well you’ve managed to keep up!” “We’re so proud of how well you’ve done!” These feel great at the start, but after a while they become a burden. Soon it can become: …

#Fearless Family: What To Expect From US Healthcare

By Lindsey LaForge #Fearless Family Writer Interacting with the healthcare system can be a daunting and anxiety provoking experience, especially if you’ve never done it on your own! Knowing what to expect ahead of time can help lessen some of that anxiety and uncertainty. This article discusses some of the common healthcare settings (in the United States) and answers some general questions to help you prepare! Doctor’s Offices How do I get a doctor? Do a quick internet search for your area or use your insurance company’s website to search for covered providers. Then, call and see if they are: a) accepting new patients, and b) accepting your insurance. If you don’t have insurance, some offices have programs in place to provide free or lower cost care. Don’t be afraid to call and ask! My doctor’s office has a doctor and a nurse practitioner/physician’s assistant. Which one should I see? In a primary care setting, either is fine! Nurse practitioners or physicians assistants can do most of the same things a doctor can do (do …

We Are Fearless: An Unfortunate Turn of Events

By Pascalle J.M. #Fearless Family Writer Suffering from emetophobia is a harsh reality for many. I have struggled with this phobia ever since I was a very young child. My phobia started when I was around the age of eight. As a child, I was not really scared to get sick myself. But for some reason, the sight, sound and whole atmosphere of someone getting sick close to me terrified me and was enough to send me into sheer panic. I constantly asked other children if they felt ill, just to be sure that I was in the clear. If someone looked a little pale, or rejected food I would stay away from that person. For some strange reason, I developed an almost supernatural ability to judge whether someone is about to get sick or not. I guess I developed strong senses and the ability to observe sharply.